Elevator Pitch

Tackling your Elevator Pitch

Many of our clients hate networking when they first start working with us. They struggle with introducing themselves to new people, especially at job fairs, conferences and other networking events. We have found that this discomfort typically stems from a lack of practice and fear of looking silly.

A strong elevator pitch written out and practiced will go a long way towards calming your nerves. You’ll be able to appear professional when you meet someone unexpectedly.

What is an elevator pitch?

It’s simply a 30-second speech (it can be told  to another person during a short elevator ride) that tells strangers who you are, what you’re looking for, and why they should hire you. Check out this Forbes article for more basics.

We know it can  feel fake to write out these scripts – but you don’t have to memorize them word-for-word – and we are not asking you to sound like a robot. The more you practice introducing yourself professionally, the more natural it will feel.

The components of your elevator pitch are:

  • Your name
  • Your university’s name
  • Your degree
  • A brief sentence or two about what you would like to do and why.

Follow this with any relevant past experience. Don’t be afraid to brag a little, the purpose is to make yourself sound interesting and appealing.

Here is an example:

“Hi, my name is Eric and I will be graduating from Middlebury with a degree in Film Studies.  I am planning on moving to Los Angeles to find work working with a small film company doing editing work.  I had an amazing internship with a production company last summer which helped me get clear which aspects of film making I was most interested in and gave me some solid experience with key editing software.”

Then it can be adjusted in an email or a conversation to:

“Hi, my name is Eric and Susan suggested that I give you a call to see if you would be willing to do an informational interview with me.  I will be graduating from Middlebury in a few months with a degree in Film Studies.  I am planning on moving to Los Angeles to find work working with a small film company doing editing work after graduation.  I had an amazing internship with a production company last summer which helped me get clear which aspects of film making I was most interested in and gave me some solid experience with key editing software. Would you be willing to have a conversation with me where I could learn more about your career path and ask for your advice and counsel re: getting started in the film industry?  I will follow up with a call early next week.”

Don’t forget to ban these three words from your vocabulary, and read more about networking here. Contact us for more help with any career coaching questions.